Horses
Rules and Resources

Horse Public Speaking and Demonstration Contest

HORSE PUBLIC SPEAKING CONTEST

Objectives

1. Acquire skills, confidence and poise in speaking to groups regarding an interesting horse related topic.

2. Expand your horse knowledge and increase your research and study techniques.

3. Learn how to organize your thoughts and express these ideas in a logical and concise manner.

4. Gain increased knowledge and control of the English language in expressing your ideas.

Age Divisions

• Junior: 8-13 years of age as of January 1 of the current year

• Senior: 14-18 years of age as of January 1 of the current year

Contest Rules

1. There are no pre-qualifiers for this state event — any 4-H member may enter.  A county may have multiple contestants. 

2. This is an individual contest.

3. The subject matter must pertain to the horse industry. Speeches not appropriately related to the horse industry can be disqualified at the discretion of the judge(s).

4. The presentation must be 4-6 minutes in length for junior participants and 7-10 minutes in length for seniors.  Three points will be deducted from the total score for every minute (or fraction of a minute) under or over the time limit. 

5. Only the Judge(s) may ask questions of the participants.  Question time will not be counted as part of the allotted time.

6. Contestants should cite their major references after the conclusion of their speech. This time will not be counted in the allotted time.

7. No visual/audio aids may be used. Use of these aids qualifies this speech as an illustrated talk and will disqualify the participant in public speaking. (Visual/audio aids include but are not limited to: posters, pamphlets, tape players/recorders, videos,etc.).

8. Contestants may use notes. However, excessive use of notes may be counted against the contestant. This will be at the discretion of the judges.

9. Ties will be broken first by the judges’ accumulated delivery score, second by the judges’ accumulated organization score and third on content and accuracy score. The judges scores are final. 

10. Contestants must not have participated in official post-secondary (university, college, junior college, or technical school) competitive events of a similar nature in the same subject matter area. Neither can the contestant be a member of a post-secondary team undergoing training in preparation for an event.

11. Many speakers in the Public Speaking Contest have given speeches in other contests. This is fine; however previous speeches may not be used verbatim for the 4-H Horse contest. It is okay to use the same ideas from a speech previously delivered in competition, but it must be 4-H Horse related. Enough changes should be made to make that speech new to the speaker and the audience. 4-H public speakers may not use an old speech written by a sibling, other 4-H member, or anyone else.

12. The judges will consider the questions listed under each section. The points on the score card will be as follows:

A. INTRODUCTION           10 points

1.  Did the introduction serve to create interest in the subject?

2.  Was the introduction short and to the point?

B. ORGANIZATION           15 points

1.  Were the main points easy to follow?

2.  Were the main points arranged in the best order?

3.  Were the sentences short and easy to understand?

4.  Was the speech interesting?

C. CONTENT AND ACCURACY       20 points

1.  Were the facts and information accurate?

2.  Was there enough information concerning the subject?

3.  Was credit given to the sources of information, if it was appropriate?

4.  Was the content appropriately related to the equine industry?

D. STAGE PRESENCE        15 points

1.  Was the speaker neat and appropriately dressed?

2.  Did the speaker talk directly to and look at the audience?

3.  Was the speaker’s posture erect, but not stiff?

4.  Did the speaker refrain from leaning on the podium?

5.  Did the speaker seem relaxed and at ease?

E. DELIVERY        20 points

1.  Did the speaker have appropriate voice control?

2.  Were all word pronounced correctly?

3.  If notes were used, was it done without detracting from the speech?

4.  Did the speaker seem to choose words at the time they were spoken as opposed to a memorized or ready-type delivery?

F. GENERAL         10 points

1.  Did the speaker convey to the audience a sense of wanting to communicate?

2.  Did the speech reflect the thoughts and personality of the speaker?

G. CONCLUSION               10 points

1.  Was the conclusion short and interesting?

2.  Did the conclusion properly wrap up the speech?

3.  Did the speaker answer questions easily and correctly?

HORSE DEMONSTRATION CONTEST

Objectives

1. Encourage youth to teach others and provide information while demonstrating correct use of visuals on a horse related topic.

2. Give youth confidence in their ability to present information in a logical and concise manner.

3. Increase the level of horse knowledge and expertise.

4. Improve a youth’s study skills, and ability to use correct English, and speaking skills.

Age Divisions

•  Junior: 8-13 years of age as of January 1 of the current year

•  Senior: 14-18 years of age as of January 1 of the current year

Contest Rules

1. There are no pre-qualifiers for this state event — any 4-Her may enter.  A county may have multiple contestants. 

2.  Youth may participating the demonstration contest either as an individual or as a team.  Teams consist of two members.

3. The demonstration/illustrated talk must be 5-7 minutes for juniors and 9-12 minutes for seniors. Team demonstrations must be 10-15 minutes in length. A 1-point deduction for each minute under and a 3-point deduction for each minute over will be assessed. It is recommended that both team members speaking time be nearly equal.

4. The subject must pertain to the horse industry. Presentations not appropriately related to the horse industry can be disqualified at the discretion of the judges.

5. The presentation may be a demonstration or illustrated talk. All references to the term “presentation” in these rules include either demonstration or illustrated talk. A demonstration is defined as a presentation of a step by step procedure with an end product or result. An illustrated talk is defined as a presentation of an idea or topic that uses visual aids to convey the message. Both presentation forms are acceptable and will be evaluated equally, although the delivery methods are different as defined above. Both should utilize visual aids to help convey the major points of the presentation and more than one type of visual aid is preferable. Visual aids may include but are not limited to: handouts, posters, props, videos, slides, and computer generated media (PowerPoint, websites, etc.). No live animals may be used.

6. Contestants may use notes. However excessive use of notes may be counted against the contestant. This will be at the discretion of the judge(s).

7.  Participants must supply their own props and equipment. 

8. Creative audio visual aids may be used but the contestant must be involved in making or designing them.

9. Contestants should cite their major references after the conclusion of their presentation.  This will not be counted in the allotted time.

10. No coaching from parents or coaches during the presentation.  Once an individual has started their presentation, they may not receive assistance from any coach, parent, audience member, or other person, which includes, but is not limited to, the stroking of any key on a computer or other audio visual device. The penalty for violating this rule is disqualification.

11.  Many demonstrators in the Demonstration Contest have given demonstrations in other contests. This is fine; however previous demonstrations may not be used verbatim for the 4-H Horse contest. It is okay to use the same ideas from a demonstration previously delivered in competition, but it must be 4-H Horse related. Enough changes should be made to make the demonstration new to the demonstrator and the audience. 4-H demonstrators may not use an old demonstration written by a sibling, other 4-H member, or any else.

12.  Ties will be broken first by the judges’ accumulated delivery score, second by the judges’ accumulated organization score and third on content and accuracy score.

13. Judges will consider the questions listed under each section. The points on the score card will be as follows:

A. INTRODUCTION 10 points

1. Did the introduction serve to create interest in the subject?

2. Was introduction short and to the point?

B. ORGANIZATION 25 points

1. Was only one main idea presented?

2. Did the discussion relate directly to each step as it was shown?

3. Was each step shown just as it should be done in an actual situation or was a thorough

explanation given?

4. Could the audience see each step and/or visual aid?

5. Were materials and equipment carefully selected, neatly arranged, and well organized?

6. Were visual aids used if and when needed?

7. Were the key points for each step stressed?

C. CONTENT AND ACCURACY 25 points

1. Were facts and information presented accurate?

2. Was there enough information presented about the subject?

3. Were approved practices used?

4. Was credit given to the sources of information, if it was appropriate?

5. Was the content appropriately related to the horse industry?

D. STAGE PRESENCE 10 points

1. Were the presenters neat and appropriately dressed for the subject of presentation?

2. Did the presenters speak directly to and look at the audience?

3. Was the presentation too fast or too slow?

E. DELIVERY 15 points

1. Did the presenters appear to enjoy giving their presentation?

2. Did the presenters have good voice control?

3. Were all words pronounced correctly?

4. If notes were used, was it done without detracting from the presentation?

5. Did the presenters seem to choose words at the times they were spoken, as opposed to a memorized presentation?

6. Did the presenters work together as a team?

F. EFFECT ON AUDIENCE 5 points

1. Did the audience show an interest in the presentation?

2. Could the audience go home and carry out the idea?

G. SUMMARY 10 points

1. Was the summary short and interesting?

2. Were the key points briefly reviewed?

3. Did the summary properly wrap up the presentation?

4. Could presenters handle questions easily?